A Christian-Evolutionist’s odd position in faith.

A Christian-Evolutionist’s odd position in faith.


Some say it’s an oxymoron, but I am not sure. I do know I am one.

Creation is the hottest topic between the religious vs. atheist crowd. Science against faith stories. Evidence against faith. It’s a really a hot button for many. I have seen people become very personal and argumentative when it comes to creation. For some reason, this is the topic which carries a lot of emotional baggage with it. I have seen a lot of people behave offensively on this.

I have been a lot of things actually. I have been a devout YEC, an evolution basher, an enthusiastic Gap theorist, then a euphoric OEC and then a troubled Theistic evolutionist. And now I am more inclined to be just an evolutionist, and not so much troubled anymore. My transition has been across the board from atheist to agnostic to slightly deist to YEC to OEC and within that from Gap theory to Theistic Evolution. The more I studied, the more I figured that evolution was undeniable.

Apparently, a lot of believers don’t agree with me when it comes to that. I don’t blame them. It is not an easy thing to do. It took me some time to come to realize that there is probably no way that I may able to square things out between my faith and science, or between faith and evolution. That is my opinion, and some believers have no trouble reconciling science and creation, and I am fine with that.

However, my conclusion is that the biblical creation story quite certainly makes a strong case for Read more

Reflection of the Overzealous believer

Reflection of the Overzealous believer


When I first started this blog, I was angry, hateful and amateur. I yelled, ranted, vented out. I said stupid things, I wrote some stupid stuff, which is still in the early posts of this blog. Some of the things you can read if you look up the old archives. I’m not proud of it.

With time, I learnt a few things and gained some perspective and gradually that reflected on my person and in my writings. Now when I come across someone like me four years ago, I try my best to show them that their attitude is all wrong. That they are having tunnel vision and that things are not that much black and white as you think they are. Plenty of grey areas are there. The more I have matured in my thinking, the less concrete answers I have.

And honestly, I have gained some peace in myself for a lot of things. I have started to trust God a little with some of the things, not all, but some things entirely. I can sit back and relax on those. And now I look back and see that is what was always missing from me, peace. But I was full of zeal but it was misdirected in a lot of ways and for all the slap-shut answers I had for my opponents, it left me distressed mostly.

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And then the warmth left the room

And then the warmth left the room


It happened very recently that I had a sit down with some of my christian friends. It was a usual thing, nothing special but as always a few theological fine points were up for discussion. When it came to me, I recalled my experience of finding God and then walking with him. There were smiles all around the room for we all had seen and shared some time and all of my friends had witnessed how my life had had a turn around for God. So recounting what I had been pondering for over a year in silence and what I had begin to properly understand quite recently I mentioned that I found it a real beautiful thing that God had used evolutionary mechanisms to derive life and that the whole structure was so self sustaining that even without any active interference from God, it had the tendency to carry on natural work. I also said that Adam and Eve may have been factual people but the story of Genesis 1 is more of a lesson rather than a strict scientific account and it was never meant to be taken literal. And that I do not think the story in all of its detail is factual.

Silence fell!

Everyone looked at me with mixed expression, raised eyebrows and might I add, a few frowns. A few of them shook their heads in dismay. And then, when I was just a wee bit nervous, I began to understand my mistake. The cat was out of the bag. And then came the barrage of questions and rhetoric and accusations, clocked at 200 miles an hour with no stops. To be honest for a moment I thought I was standing in front of the inquisition.

From being asked why I would reject “The word of God” to “Are you even a christian, do you even believe in a Christ?”…I was spared “the devil’s spawn” but one of my friends even implied that when he said that by holding on to such lies, I was “doing satan’s work” and “pushing others away from God and leading them astray”…one of them called me “spiritually blind” and that “the bible is worthless to you”.

I was dumbfounded, and I noticed while my friends were still there, the brotherly love and christian warmth that I had felt all those years, had left the room.

Do you need the bible to be a good person?

Do you need the bible to be a good person?


Absolutely no. You can use the bible to be a good person but it is important to understand the fact that there is a sense of right and wrong which is somewhat real to almost every person, except for the medically insane. This is also what C.S Lewis also talks about in the opening chapters of his classic book “Mere Christianity”, the moral law, as he called it. And one can be a good person without the bible.

Of late I have heard a lot of atheist complaining about christians that since the atheist lack a christian faith that automatically means they are without morals or people with no sense of morals. This is very wrong of us to do. This should not be done.

I have seen a lot of atheist-theist wars and now most of them just seem silly to me, an theist venting out or an atheist venting out are just that, folks who need to vent and on one needs to take it seriously as a moral crusader on both sides to just prove the point because frankly, loud mouthed bashing seldom hits home and rarely makes an impact, if at all.

There is a flaw in the argument when we say he is an atheist therefore his moral compass is bound to be screwed. He may not have a book to show you where he gets his morals from, and to be honest most atheists don’t feel the need to have a book at all, but that does not mean that he can’t be moral person. When in the dark ages and the days of the early church, when the church for almost a thousand years had forbidden the average believer like you and me to not read the bible or own one, does that mean all of those people were moral-lacking people who survived, prayed, believed and died for their faith, despite never even reading a bible? Not at all.

This fundamental error in judgement is a gross mistake of ours and when we need to stop making it. While a lot of atheists may lack a source of objective morals, unlike christians who think they have the objective basis, it is still not a fine point we need to hammer down just to feel that we have an upper hand in the argument.

Respect your neighbor because that is still a step behind than love your neighbour which we should be aiming at, even if that neighbor turns out to be an atheist or a hindu or a muslim or a mormon or a gay person that should not stop us from accepting the fact that they are too God’s children, and it is by your love they will see your morals and your faith.

You can be theologically correct while being empty in the spirit, devoid of the fruit of love which in a believer should be foremost and abundant. There is a fine line between good apologetics and bigotry. There is a fine line between defending your faith and insulting others.

Even Paul said that the law of God is written on the heart of men, even when they lack a written law. This is what the bible says at Romans 2:13-16. Is it that hard to accept it then?

Chill out folks, build bridges, not burn them. People can be of differing faiths and be very nice and good, having good morals. Lets be accepting rather than rejecting. Better, respectful communication leads to a healthier discussion. If you aim to interact, do it the right way.

An Open Letter to My Daughter

An Open Letter to My Daughter



A great expression of love from a father to his daughter, wonderfully told.

————-

Dear L.Y.,

In a box somewhere in the garage there is footage of the two of us. Although it’s lost in storage, it streams in my memory. I am holding you. You fit neatly in my two hands. My heart fits perfectly around your little finger – small as it was. It is a long time ago. It is the embodiment of that worn out metaphor we reach for to describe fathers and daughters. “Tied around fingers” or something like that. Clearly, I am entwined. I’ve always been. Quietly, I bend down and whisper something to you. It’s hard to make out what I’m saying on this fuzzy old tape. But, I know exactly what I said. I’ve been saying it for fourteen years. You have heard me say it in word and deed every day since. “You will always be this child here in my hands. I will never leave you nor forsake you. I love you.” It is fourteen years ago, but it is easily today.

One day, if God wills, you will know how deeply a parent loves a child. It is the bottomless vein in a parent’s heart. But, you will never know how intensely a father loves a daughter. It’s hard to put into words. It is a mixture of strength and softness unique to this bond. A father’s love hovers like a citadel over the untouched treasure of his daughter’s life. (This is why your dad acts like a suspicious sniper around you.) A daughter thrives within its safe barrier. A father’s love for his daughter is a preservative against a thousand ills seeking to infect the innocence of her life.

Is it any wonder ladies are reduced to tears as they look back on the landscape of their life and cannot see a father’s sweetness? It is a deep regret… and needless. Girls need dads. Neglect here is cruel. The worst thing a dad can do sometimes is nothing. It seems I counsel the ubiquitous broken young lady on a weekly basis. She is the lost young woman who seeks self-worth in the affection of a young man – never having received it from dad. Hers is a deep pain. Tenderness is a sublime power in a father’s hand. It is amazing what time spent showing love at eight does for a little girl when she is twenty-eight. It builds a confidence as few things can. It is a foundation set deep in the heart.

You do not fully realize it now, but one day in the midst of life’s many hardships you’ll see what I’ve been doing all these years. You’ll see what I whispered to you many years ago. In the darkness of your pain, you’ll reach down and suddenly feel a foundation beneath you. I know you love me. I know you respect me more than any other man on this earth. But, I have not been turning your heart to me all these years, as much as to My God. My leadership of your life is intended to provide you the slightest glimpse of His awesome power over all things, including you. I know My God will steady you.

When the time comes you will sense a steadfastness you had not sensed before. There in that moment, His love will be my greatest gift to you. A vision of a mighty God, which I have painstakingly opened to you conversation by conversation & tenderness by tenderness, will come up and catch you. My own love, incomplete and imperfect, will now make sense in the infinite shadow of His. You will bend down quietly before your life and say, “Thank you, Daddy. God is Great. He has neither left me nor forsaken me.” Your earthly father will be content in being overshadowed by your Heavenly one. You are not mine. You are His. I will rejoice from within the cleft of His greatness as I watch my daughter worship from knees I once put Band-Aids on.

I pray that my care for you brings into sharp focus the love of Our Savior. Unconditional. Sacrificial. Patient. True. Serving. Consistent. Present. I pray my sincere affection is a contrast to the many deceptions that parade as love in this world. I pray the sight of your father in broken worship of Christ gives you the courage to raise your own heart up in praise before mankind. I pray my transparent confession of sin and weakness will incline you to retreat into Christ’s righteousness at the sight of your own. I pray most earnestly that you will have not merely copied your father’s faith, but sincerely found the Lord Jesus Christ as the supreme object of your own.

Dear child, do not settle. Love a man who loves Christ more than you – and you more than himself. Be attracted to tenderness, lowliness, self-restraint, consistency and sacrifice. Seek that man who carries the imprint of our Lord’s cross upon his life. Love that man who does not live in fear of your emotions, but in fear of your Lord. Don’t marry a boy… no matter how old he may be. Do not fall for the first young man who comes along and shows you attention. Rather, follow that man whom comes along and resembles the unconditional grace of your Lord Jesus.

I am so sorry about the condition of the average young male. I regret that they confuse lust with love. I am saddened that they are more proficient at gaming than at balancing a checkbook. I cringe that they know more of sports trivia than doctrine. I apologize that they know better how to handle a gun (which is completely respectable in one sense) than how to treat a lady. I know godliness in a man is hard to find. But, find it. Otherwise, you will spend your life raising the man you thought you married. The church and this culture are filled with boys masquerading as men. Let them pass.

The man you are looking for is no boy. He is a servant. He cares for your needs above his own. If I am at all the man I claim to be, you may look at your father’s love for your mother and know what it is I’m describing. You should be able to recognize it when you see it. That man who will lay down his life for yours is the type of man you can easily give yours to. The man who sacrifices himself is easy to serve sacrificially.

By God’s grace, I have only intended my own love to serve as a high-water mark in your soul. None except Christ’s love for you will rise above mine. This way, when that man – whom I pray for everyday – comes along and exceeds your father’s love, you will willingly give him your heart. And I (secretly desiring to shoot him and bury his remains in an undisclosed location) will lovingly pass on my treasure to that man who stormed the fortress of a father’s love with a weapon as meager as a servant’s apron.

Your Dad

1 corinthians 2:2 “For I determined to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ, and Him crucified

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Original article here An Open Letter to My Daughter.

How atheism became a religion in all but name

How atheism became a religion in all but name


How atheism became a religion in all but name | Frank Furedi | spiked.

Read the full article by clicking the link above.

How atheism became a religion in all but name | Frank Furedi | spiked

excerpt:

Today, in contrast, atheism takes itself very seriously indeed. With their zealous denunciation of religion, the so-called New Atheists often resemble medieval moral crusaders. They argue that the influence of religion should be fought wherever it rears its ugly head. Although they demand that religion should be countered by rational arguments, their own claims often verge on the irrational and hysterical. Of course, there has always been an honourable atheist tradition of irreverence and irreligious contempt for dogma. But today’s New Atheism often expresses itself through a doctrinaire language of its own. In a simplistic manner it equates religion with fanaticism and fundamentalism. What is striking about its denunciation of fundamentalism is that it is frequently made in the dogmatic, polemical style of those it claims to oppose. The black-and-white world of theological dogma is reproduced in the zealous polemic of the atheist moraliser…

…The New Atheism is very selective about who it targets. So although it claims to challenge irrationalism and anti-scientific prejudice, it tends to confine its anger to the dogma of the three Abrahamic religions. So it rightly criticises creationism and ‘intelligent design’, yet it rarely challenges the mystifications of deep environmentalist thinking, such as Gaia theory, or the numerous varieties of Eastern mysticism that are so fashionable in Hollywood. Since the New Atheism is culturally wedded to the contemporary therapeutic imagination, it is not surprising that it has adopted a double standard towards spiritualism.

Historically, atheism has sometimes co-existed with opportunism towards religious and spiritual belief. The French philosopher Voltaire hated religious fanaticism but nevertheless believed that religion was useful for pacifying the masses. In a similar vein, in the nineteenth century, the French social theorists Henri de Saint-Simon and Auguste Comte believed that social stability required them to invent a new religion. Invariably, such attempts to construct a secular religion are really about trying to endow human experience with meaning.

It was inevitable that sooner or later the New Atheist crusade would mutate into a quasi-religion. Alain de Botton’s recently published Religion for Atheists: A Non-Believer’s Guide to the Uses of Religion is an attempt to absorb into atheism the current therapeutic and spiritual fads that influence Western elite culture. De Botton has proposed building temples for atheists through the UK. ‘It’s time atheists had their own versions of the great churches and cathedrals’, he says. Unlike the New Atheists, De Botton does not adopt an aggressive approach towards religion, which means his attitude does at least contrast to that of Dawkins or Harris.